Shaking loose from hands, hand stroking head

Godliness ii pp.44. “With a cry of fear, David turned and, shaking himself loose from the hands that held him, ran away through the forest. He did not believe that the man who turned up his face and in a harsh voice shouted at the sky was his grandfather at all. The man did not look like his grandfather. The conviction that something strange and terrible had happened, that by some miracle a new and dangerous person had come into the body of the kindly old man, took possession of him. On and on he ran down the hillside, sobbing as he ran. When he fell over the roots of a tree and in falling struck his head, he arose and tried to run on again. His head hurt so that presently he fell down and lay still, but it was only after Jesse had carried him to the buggy and he awoke to find the old man’s hand stroking his head tenderly that the terror left him. “Take me away. There is a terrible man back there in the woods,” he declared firmly, while Jesse looked away over the tops of the trees and again his lips cried out to God. “What have I done that Thou dost not approve of me,” he whispered softly, saying the words over and over as he drove rapidly along the road with the boy’s cut and bleeding head held tenderly against his shoulder.”

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“Hands that held him” is the same phrase used of Elmer Cowley (122).

And, in The Untold Lie Ray Pearson “shook Hal’s hands loose” from his shoulders.


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